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, and later she will meet with mahmoud abbas and president morsi in israel. what are you hearing about the talks with netanyahu? >> they met about two hours with netanyahu, the defense minister, foreign minister, national security team. they spent two hours going over what's being released. the state department says she was briefed on the israeli position on all these issues. she wants to see a deescalation of what's going on, she uses the word a calm. they are avoiding the word cease-fire for right now but throughout the day, there is speculation coming from hamas and egyptian officials that they were close to a cease-fire. israelis downplaying the possibility. saying they weren't there until they actually had an agreement. there's no agreement, and if anything, there's an intensification of the shelling of southern israel today by hamas and the intensification of the israeli attacks in gaza. witnessed on what you have seen over the last hour or two in gaza city, the negotiations will continue tomorrow. the negotiations will continue tomorrow, hillary clinton as you point out, going t
landed in tel aviv, met with prime minister benjamin netanyahu. later on she will meet with mahmoud abbas, then go to israel, to cairo, to meet with mohammed morsi. what are you hearing about what's come out of her talks with netanyahu? >> well, they met for about two hours, and it wasn't just with the prime minister, but the defense minister of israel, the foreign minister, the national security team. they spent two hours going over what's going on. the statement released by the state department says she was briefed on the israeli position on all these issues. she's making it clear she wants to see a deescalation of what's going on. she uses the word a calm. they are avoiding the word cease-fire for right now but throughout the day, as you know, there was speculation coming from hamas and egyptian officials that they were close to a cease-fire agreement. the israelis downplaying that possibility, saying they weren't there until they actually had an agreement. there's no agreement and if anything, it looks like there was an intensification of the shelling in southern israel today by hamas
president mahmoud abbas and with egyptian president mohammed morsi tomorrow. i want to bring in cnn's wolf blitzer, who is live for us in jerusalem tonight, and anderson cooper and ben wedeman, both in gaza city. wolf, let me start with you if i may. a very tense day with claim and counterclaim coming almost on an hourly basis. there was going to be a cease-fire, then no cease-fire. both sides trading sort of insults and then offering fig leaves. what do you make of it all? as we talk now in the middle of a night there, what do you make of where we really are with this? >> well, throughout most of the day, i thought they were very close to reaching a cease-fire agreement. all the signs looked rather positive. then all of a sudden, on this day, it was getting increasingly more tense in the southern part of israel and what we've been seeing in gaza, very, very bloody as well. you wouldn't know that they are apparently rather close to some sort of a deal, that the egyptian government, the new president, mohammed morsi, seemed to be brokering. they may still get some sort of cease-fire agreeme
? in particular with mahmoud abbas, with the palestinian authority, with the group with israel and the united states has been trying to deal with. and as you said, trying to political isolate hamas by not recognizing them? >> reporter: well, i think this must be a nightmare for the palestinian authority and mahmoud abbas, because all the attention has been on gaza, and he has been seated at the table, obviously talking to the egyptians, to the u.s. and israel. but nonetheless, seated at the table. i think what is really interesting, if indeed, the parameters of this cease-fire include the lifting of the blockade of gaza, and easing of restrictions, trade and commerce, and travel restrictions, and by the israelis if it results in a lack of rockets coming into israel. no more rockets being fired into israel, and no more re-supply of weapons to gaza, then perhaps there is something to build on. but the fact of the matter is, it looks like hamas is a force to be reckoned with, even eight days after this war. >> and negotiations, if the cease-fire holds for the next 24 hours, negotiations are to b
. >> and how does that change the dynamic, you think? in particular with mahmoud abbas, the palestinian authority, which is the group that israel and the united states has been trying to deal with and, as you said, trying to politically isolate hamas by not recognizing them? >> well, i think this must be a nightmare for the palestinian authority and mahmoud abbas. because all the attention has been on hamas in gaza and meshaal has been here with a seat at the table obviously talking through the egyptians to the u.s. and to israel. nonetheless, a seat at the table. i think what's really interesting is if, indeed, the parameters of this cease-fire include a lifting of the blockade of gaza and easing of restrictions, trade and commerce, travel restrictions, and by -- for the israelis if it results in a lack of rockets coming into israel, no more rockets being fired into israel, and no more resupply of weapons to gaza, then, perhaps, there's something to build on. but the fact of the matter is that it looks like hamas is a force to be reckoned with even after this eight days or more of war.
. on the palestinian side, president mahmoud abbas described this resolution as a last chance for peace. implicit in that is the argument by recognizing a palestinian state, the united nations emboldens and strengthens mahmoud abbas' moderate fatah party against the more militant hamas. israeli official said this is not about any particular palestinian faction and they said, in fact, palestinians of all political stripes have repeatedly turned away from negotiations and towards violence. here are the arguments from both sides in the order that they were presented to the general assembly. listen. >> the general assembly stands before a moral duty, which it must not hesitate to undertake and stands duty, which cannot endure further delay. >> the truth is, that israel wants peace and the palestinians are avoiding peace. those are supporting the resolution today are not advancing peace. they are undermining peace. the u.n. was founded to advance the cause of peace. today the palestinians are turning their back on peace. >> the u.s., of course, agreed with that israeli argument but not many other nati
of the palestinian people is the palestinian authority in ramallah, mahmoud abbas, the person that secretary clinton will be dealing with and meeting with. they are the people that the u.s. recognizes. but you also have hamas, which controls gaza. and actually you could argue, and many people would accept, that the palestinian authority really doesn't have any control or very little control over gaza. so in effect you could say there are almost two governments for the palestinians. one more radicalized and the other you would have to say a government that the u.s. can certainly deal with. that's the problem. so the only people who have real influence on gaza are the egyptians, maybe some other people, but certainly the egyptians and that's what they're trying to do. >> all right. major player, clearly, in talks for the cease-fire. there are some breaking news we're going to be hoping to get ben wedeman back on the phone as more rockets fall in gaza city. now, as we get word of a coming period, many residents and one israeli town are not happy about the possibility of a cease-fire. we're going to be
as war criminals. that's our major focus. >> despite the rhetoric, angry rhetoric from mahmoud abbas at the assembly today and the rhetoric from leaders, basically there's a good relationship between the israeli government and the palestinian authority. >> well, we have a working relationship with the palestinian authority. we cooperate on security matters. we're interacting in many, many ways every day whether it be in commerce or providing electricity and water to the palestinian areas. we are neighbors. >> you'd rather see them strengthened as opposed to hamas. >> we agree. but the way to strengthen is to come to the negotiating table. what we've learned between this hamas and gaza, hamas had this big victory parade and declared they were strong, at the end of the day they have no power unless they're engaged in negotiations with us. who was the strongest player in that whole period? it was egypt. egypt was strong because egypt has peace with israel. the way to be strong is not by making war and unilateral declarations in the u.n. that have no meaning. the way to gain strength is
. they have come out with somewhat elevated stature. >> how does that change the dynamic with mahmoud abbas, the palestinian authority, the group israel and the united states has been trying to deal with, and trying to politically isolate hamas by not recognizing them? >>> well, i think this must be a nightmare for the palestinian authority and abbas, all of the attention on hamas in gaza. and ishma i think what's really interesting is if indeed the parameters of this cease-fire include a lifting of the blockade of gaza, easing of restrictions, trade in commerce, travel restrictions and for the israelis if it results in a lack of rockets coming into israel, no more rockets being fired into israel and no resupply of weapons to gaza, then perhaps there is something to build on, but the fact of the matter is it looks like hamas is a force to be reckoned with even after eight days or more of war. >> and negotiations if the cease-fire holds, are to begin for these next steps? >> yes, obviously this is a cease-fire, but many more things to be built on it, the interesting thing which didn't happen
with palestinian president mahmoud abbas and she is set to sit down with egyptian president mohamed morsi. >>> no claim of responsibility on that bus explosion yet but word is that hamas has blessed the attacks. we go to ben wedeman for more on that. >> reporter: what we heard from a nearby mosque is an announcement saying that, quote, unquote, lions from the west bank had carried out that attack in tel aviv. there was also the suggestion in that announcement from the mosque that hamas was somehow responsible for that attack. however, the television affiliated with the hamas movement said yes, they did bless that attack but said it was a, quote, unquote, natural reaction to israel's offensive against the gaza strip. so, there has been no claim of responsibility by hamas or by anybody else at this point regarding that attack. now there was some scattered celebratory gunfire in gaza after news of the attack in tel aviv. i'm not aware of anybody handing out candy. it's important to stress that not everybody supports hamas in the gaza strip. and there are many people who are unhappy with the
this meeting in the west bank in ramallah with mahmoud abbas. she will reportedly meet again today with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu before jetting to cairo for talks with the president of egypt, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netan
as mahmoud abbas, by his proper name, said do not pursue this. this will only create problems for you in congress. you will lose money, you will lose legitimacy, not gain legitimacy. why do you think that's an important step? >> that one vote will hurt but it can be compensated for elsewhere. the point is this man and movement that he heads and this government that he heads in the west bank, is struggling for legitimacy. what hamas has done is become the center of attention and the driving force in -- on the palestinian street -- >> hasn't the train left the station for abbas and fayyad and the others in that wing of the palestinians. >> i was going to say the second step. the first step is recognizing that right to independence and statehood. giving it some formal credence. secondly, is to support palestinian unity which is absolutely critical. you cannot have a hamas government in one place, a palestinian authority in the other place, both of them dependent on external funding sources to survive and consider this somehow an approach to peace. there has to be one negotiating authorit
to the palestinian authority, mahmoud abbas? >> it will. not because of the united states', you know, help. actually, united states is voting against it. and -- >> in a voting bloc with israel. >> in bloc with israel undermining their own interest. these are the aspiration of a nation to have freedom, dignity and democracy. these are where the aspiration of the arab spring -- >> but until the u.s. doesn't feel that hamas is a terrorist organization -- >> it's not hamas who's asking this. it's not hamas who's asking. it's the palestinian authority. abbas. we told them what to do. we put the set of conditions. they met all of these set of conditions, terms of security for israel and the west bank and everything else. but then we humiliated them, ignored them. they were desperate. this is a desperate move. it's the smartest move that they can -- >> when it comes to having the palestinian people unified under fatah or hamas, there's a big structural difference there between those two sides. so without the unification of that doesn't that make it difficult to know who you're dealing with? especially isra
action. palestinian president mahmoud abbas also released a statement saying he hopes obama will continue his efforts to achieve peace in the middle east. >>> the elite officials in charge of china are gathering in beijing to chart the country's future. the communist party is about to begin its transition of power. hu jintao and other leaders who have been at the top for a decade are stepping aside. and the next generation is taking over. the 18th congress of the chinese communist party starts thursday. the meeting happens every five years. delegates will approve new policies and appoint new party leaders for the five years to come. chinese authorities waited until the eve of the congress to confirm details of this year's gathering. nhk world's michitaka yamaka in beijing has more. >> reporter: chinese communist party gathered in beijing's great hall of the people to make their long-awaited announcement. they said the national congress will start thursday and run for seven days. the meetings wraps up a ten-year-long, two-term rule of general secretary hu jintao and his associates. they le
minutes with mahmoud abbas, some people question what role he has to play since he has little influence over hamas and what is happening in the gaza strip. the state department put outward that secretary of state hillary clinton did raise with president mahmoud abbas the issue that the palestinians have been planning to raise at the united nations on november 28th, the issue of a palestinian state with observer status. that really is the background to this fighting. the palestinians were going to take the issue of statehood to the u.n. on november 28th. the secretary of state asking mahmoud abbas not to do so. jenna: secretary clinton certainly hard at work. we were just hearing that thousands of marines and sailors are now being delayed from coming home for the holidays because of this conflict. what can you tell bus that? >> reporter: well, remember two days ago we reported that theee whathat a ship has been stopped on their way through the mediterranean. they were halted off the coast of crete. they were supposed to be heading home and arriving on november 28th. they deployed out to
for palestinian president mahmoud abbas. now she is at the institute for middle east understanding. good morning to you what. do you see is the most important issue for palestinians? >> good morning. well, i think if we're going to be honest and move forward, then we're going to have to begin to address israel's 45-year military occupation, and in particular, it's ongoing siege and blockade of the gaza strip. that's with respect to gaza. but in terms of the bigger picture, it's not just a question of gaza, but also a question of israel finally ending its military rule over palestinians living in the west bank and in east jerusalem as well. this is the only way that we're going to begin to move forward in this region. without addressing this underlying problem, which is israel's denial of freedom to millions of palestinians, then we're just going to continue to see violence in the middle east. >> many folks in gaza, of course, want this blockade lifted so they can go in and out at their free will. but if israel were to abandon the blockade, especially on the egyptian border, what is to stop the f
the truce. >>> meanwhile, the palestinian president mahmoud abbas said sunday he is heading to the united nations this week in hopes of achieving a low level state hood status for his people. >>> rebels in syria are claiming an important victory, saying that they now hold one military base in syria. amateur video posted on a social media website showed rocket propelled grenades being fired during an overnight battle as opposition fighters captured a helicopter base, which is near the capital of damascus. and the government bombing of a village near the capital reportedly killed at least eight children while they were just outside playing. >>> now for a look at your monday weather, we check in now to nbc meteorologist bill karins. >> have a wonderful week snend. >> great holiday weekend. but back to work for a lot of folks. >> unfortunately. >> it happens. >> that's what we do. good morning everyone. it's a little chilly out there. nothing like the super storm san different remember that? we've all seen the damage pictures. this is some of the first video i've seen of when the damage was o
, the palestinian authority. the posture of the israeli government towards the government of mahmoud abbas, a posture either endorsed or tolerated by our own government makes for an extremely disquieting contrast. now as head of the palestinian authority, mahmoud abbas has renounced violence, even used security forces to go after militants. he accepts and are recognizes israel and its right to exist. he's gone so far in recent interviews to admit that palestinian was concede their right to return to the land they or their families held before 1948 inside what is now israel in return for this, he has seen basically nothing. except for the continued settlement growth. when aboss took over p.a., there are 350,000 settlers in the west bank. assume that hamas targets israeli civilians not solely because of some cult of death, but that it adopts this as a tactic to achieve certain aims. the idea that terrorism is a tactic adopted by certain groups at times was articulated by a young state senator back at a book event in 2004. >> ultimately terrorism is a tactic. it's not, we're not fighting terr
with israel's. mahmoud abbas also released a statement saying he hopes obama will continue his efforts to achieve peace in the middle east. >>> the lead officials in charge of china are gathering in beijing to chart the country's future. the communist party is about to begin its transition of power. hu jintao and other leaders who had been at the top for a decade are stepping aside. the next generation is taking over. the 18th congress of the chinese communist party starts thursday. the meeting happens every five years. delegates will approve new policies and appoint new party leaders for the five years to come. chinese authorities waited until the eve of the congress to confirm details of this year's gathering. nhk world's michitaka yamaka in beijing has more. >> reporter: chinese communist party gathered in beijing's great hall of the people to make their long-awaited announcement. they said the national congress will start thursday and run for seven days. the meetings wraps up a ten-year-long, two-term rule of general secretary hu jintao and his associates. they led a nation that ha
actually lose in this bloody conflict that killed over 150 people? >> the loser in all this is mahmoud abbas. >> iran is the main loser of this conflict. >> jon: so the only two losers in the war between israel and gaza are the people who don't live in either of those places. (laughter) so the lesson here is the next time your region descends into a war you have got to be in it to win it. welt answer right c >> welcome back to the show. now-- as we've seen, the recent fighting in the middle east has threatened the peace that had briefly interrupted the previous fighting in the middle east. raising the question of why the region's true rule certificate leting this go on. and so god, if you would, meet me at camera 3. (laughter) dude, you show -- showed up, it's so craz ooechlt i mean i know you're everywhere. camera 1? camera 4. camera 3. dude, you're totally everywhere. i thought would you have been all glittery sunbeams and mist and stuff, don't patronize me. (laughter) now that are you actually here i'm really not sure what to say, how to begin. thank you for the moon? (laughter) and
president mahmoud abbas. before flying out to cairo to consult with egyptian president mohammed morsi at the center of the efforts to bring durable cease-fire. the violence in gaza was jeff shadowing president obama's trip to asia, which was supposed to be a calm swan song enabling the outgoing secretary of state to bask over her work in countrys like burma. instead, both spent much of their time in asia intensively dialing up mideast leaders. the president speaking with morsi three times in 24 hours. including aboard air force one on the way home to america. the president tan secretary both been on the phone, nonstop with regional leaders for a number of days. the purpose of her trip is to continue and intensify that engagement now face to face. >> the stakes for the president are enormous on the eaves of a second term. with analysts warping it may be the beginning of a much wider conflict between israel and iran. >> there is rise of al-qaeda and radical islam in the middle east that have taken advantage of the re-lutionnary change sweeping through the region. in the shadows here is
president, mahmoud abbas and then will fly to egypt to speak with president mohamed morsi. that is going to be a very interesting conversation, because, of course, as so many of you are aware, morsi is in a tough situation. many of the people in egypt, obviously, don't support working with israel at all. and within the past hour, there were several explosions in gaza city. let's get straight to our team there. >> obviously, looks like we're having a problem with that shot. we'll be getting there in just a moment. difficult to communicate with them, because of these rockets that have been going off. let's try again. let's go back there to ben. >> here in gaza. there were a few hours of relative quiet. but as we have seen within really the last 15 minutes, an intense attack on a building behind right where i am. it's a complex where we understand there are some government offices, and we understand from other palestinian sources that some of the security personnel who were vacated from other areas, other offices around gaza, may have been working out of that building. so certainly there wa
mahmoud abbas. what hamas leaders believe they have achieved is to demonstrate to the palestinian people that their choice to attack israel and negotiate from that point gets better results than the baathist preferred method of peaceful negotiations. the rocket attacks are the reason israel is committed to at least considering easing the economic embargo. they are also loudly promoting the perception that they stood up to the israeli aerial on slot and that israel was afraid to launch a ground war. even some influential voices on the israeli side are accusing prime minister netanyahu of backing down. the former head of the israeli defense forces now a political rival of netanyahu said, quote: the goals of his operation were not reached and the next round is only a matter of time. we should not have stopped at this stage. hamas got stronger and we did not gain deterrence. prime minister netanyahu of course would say that his goal was to stop the rocket attacks. he did that and that israel still has the ability to go back in and crush hamas militarily if it deems it is necessary. jon. >>
leverage against israel. mahmoud abbas has said he will not negotiate with israel as long as it keeps expanding settlements in the west bank. and the israeli prime minister has refused to freeze that construction. "the fox report's" correspondent jonathan hunt is at the united nations tonight. january jonathan explain the u.s. here. >> it boils down to the simple argue that officials believe this will hinder rather than help the peace process between the israelis and palestinians, that it will enable and encourage the palestinians to pursue war crimes charges in other international institutions such as the international criminal court against israeli officials over the actions that they have taken recently in past years in gaza. in the words of the secretary of state hillary clinton today, it is simply not helpful. listen. >> path to a two state solution that fulfills the aspirations of the palestinian people is through germ and ramallah, not new york. we oppose palestinian efforts to upgrade their status at the u.n. outside of the framework of negotiations. >> secretary of state clin
authority mahmoud abbas in the west bank and benjamin net ya knetanahu in ca. let's go straight to fred pleitgen where sirens have been going off earlier. and joining us is ben wedeman in the gaza strip, gaza city. fred, what are you seeing now in ashkelon? >> reporter: >> from ted pleitgen, have the rockets stopped in ashkelon? >> reporter: the rockets, yes, have stopped in ashkelon. it was interesting, because up until about a minute before our broadcast began, there were still booms that were heard in the sky. and about ten minutes ago we had to run for cover in ashkelon. now it appears as though things are quiet. i can tell you from speaking to people here on the ground, they're telling us this he don't really believe in this cease-fire just yet at this point in time. folks that we're speaking to at this cafe who have been watching the speech of prime minister benjamin netanyahu say they believe this is not a solution to the problem that they are going to be having to face rockets falling on their heads very soon again, anderson. >> i'm also joined here in jerusalem with cnn's wolf
of state hillary clinton is in egypt. earlier she met with palestinian president mahmoud abbas and prime minister netanyahu and had this to say. >> america's commitment to israel is rock solid and unwavering. the rocket attacks from terrorist organizations inside gaza on israeli cities and towns must end and a broader calm restored. gregg: general jack keane is a four star general retired. general, great to see you. this is shuttle diplomacy. she has been in jerusalem, ramallah, now cairo. can a cease-fire be brokered here? >> i don't think she would be here unless they believed a cease-fire can be obtained. i also believe she is here because they had legitimate concerns about netanyahu going on the ground in gaza. >> what does hamas wants out of this? >> they want open borders, access to those borders in a way they don't have them now. they want the naval blockade removed. they want a significant improvement in trade. >> reporter: wouldn't that facilitate even more smuggling of rockets into gaza most of them made by iran. >> they are pushing them through africa, into the sinai, and that
people solution, is through a negotiated process. >> palestinian authority president mahmoud abbas says it's not about delegitimizing israel, it's about legitimizing a palestinian state. isn't this what everyone wants at the end of this very complicated, rather dangerous rainbow? >> it's interesting, in president abbas' remarks he never recognized israel as a jewish sovereign state. he never recognized the willingness or talked about a two state solution. he only talked about the aspirations of the palestinian people which i understand those aspirations, but those aspirations can only be fully realized through a negotiated process. and trying to get nonmember observer status as a vehicle to seek other opportunities at the united nations such as the international criminal court is truly an attempt in our view to seek to marginalize and delegitimize the state of israel. >> let's move to one key settlement that was resolved today. mitt romney went to the white house for the first time after losing the election and had a cordial lunch with the president. what do you think went on there? the
groups inside gaza to find hamas' authority there. the west bank, mahmoud abbas, hamas elements here as well, but this is where the fatah stronghold, they're the ones -- the oechbl way they want to push negotiations is if they get elevated status at the u.n. that's why we saw mahmoud abbas in europe this week trying to persuade them for support. the palestinians say, we're getting nowhere. they just announced another 1200 homes to be built in east jerusalem. >> when we're looking, we're talking about roberts going from here -- >> all the way to here. >> when we say it went towards tel-aviv but went in the walter, this is why p. thf these are not missiles. in other words, they're not putting a grild and target and firing it with accuracy. they're rockets. >> how far are we talking here? >> you're talking more than 40 kilometers and they're aiming to increase the range even more. they're getting this technology from the ukraine and from russia. they have palestinians have studied at the universities there. they've taken this technology home. this is widespread grad rocket technology. >
four years ago. >> how does mahmoud abbas, who controls the west bank, part of their territory, come out of this? >> he's sort of been sidelined by the entire thing. he has been in touch with hamas leaders here in gaza, but in a sense, he's not really a player. it's the egyptians who are really the critical intermediary between hamas and israel. mahmoud abbas is really on the sideline. >> is there a military solution to the conflict here? is this something, can israel cut out all the rockets, can they stop all the rockets just through military means? doesn't seem like it. >> no. absolutely not. you know, if they continue to get better, what hezbollah's learned to do and the iranians have is to swarm these batteries. if you fire enough rockets in one direction, the iron dome simply can't take them all down. and that's the dilemma for the israelis. if they just let this go on without a solution, they'll be worse off in two or three more years. they've got to find a diplomatic solution to this. militarily it's not winnable. >> anderson, if i can actually add something to that. the iron
. this morning clinton flew from jerusalem to the west bank to meet with mahmoud abbas, president of the palestinian authority, before returning to jerusalem with additional talks with netanyahu. secretary clinton is in cairo where she met with president mohamed morsi of egypt who's mediating the discussions. as secretary clinton carries the official white house message there is new attention being paid to the president's strategic options in the region. "the washington post" writes president obama's decision to send his top diplomat on an emergency middle east peace making mission tuesday marked an administration shift to a more active vist role in the region's affairs and offered clues to how he may use the political elbow room afforded by a second term. beyond a cease-fire agreement, the president could try to throw his political clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack
end. >> reporter: secretary clinton met with palestinian leader mahmoud abbas this morning and will meet with egyptian president mohamed morsi later today. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advance the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> reporter: egyptian president mohamed morsi is seen as critical to any peace deal. his muslim brotherhood is hamas' parent organization but egypt also has close ties to america and relies heavily on u.s. aid. susan mcginnis, cbs news, washington. >>> many journalists covering the conflict are caught in the middle. this is what cbs reporter charlie d'agata saw from his gaza city hotel early this morning. the israeli military launched dozens of air strikes. he tweeted that he and his colleagues are okay. >>> 5:09. the man who shot and killed two people at the richmond/san rafael bridge toll plaza laughed while receiving his death sentence in court yesterday. a contra costa county jury contributed for two days before determining that nathan burris should receive the
have not had good relations. you have a split palestinian people but i think mahmoud abbas is really on his back foot now because the palestinian authority and the west bank representatives have really been cut out of the process almost entirely an they're facing borderline irrelevance and i think questions will be raised in the palestinian community itself of who is our government? who is our leader? when we talk about palestinians, who are we talking about? these are going to be crucial, crucial decisions because morsi obviously feels like who he needs to deal with, especially with gaza, is hamas and he doesn't necessarily need to deal with mahmoud abbas. >> a colleague at "time" mass written about this in the future of the conflict. in this piece going on to say in the lull that follows each cycle of fighting as rebring as spring follows winter, may escape the cycle. perhaps to plant a new idea before the soil is exhausted. so again, it's about planting these seeds for future generations to come to break the cycle of hatred, violence and just perpetuates on itself. israel is not a
you tell me about this phone call between the palestinian authority president, mahmoud abbas, and one of the leaders of hamas? >> reporter: well, it most certainly is something of a warming of relations between the two specific detailsdetails at point not very clear. there seems to be an effort to unify the two palestinians bodies. at the very least at this point in time they do need to be presenting more of a united front moving forward. palestinians have been through this cycle of violence, be it in gaza or in the west bank or in other places with israel in the past. what people really want to try to find is some sort of long-term solution. we do have this short-term solution, this cease fire that so far has been holding up until now. many people do realize that unless there is a viable long-term agreement between these two entities they'll only have to relive the cycle of violence once again. for the first time since all of this began, we are seeing people out in the streets of gaza. 24 hours ago, the roads below us were completely deserted, people staying indoors, fearful, not ent
leader, mahmoud abbas. she'll be promoting a de-escalation to the violence, as well as promoting a long-term peace outcome that sees the hamas militants stopping their attacks on the southern israeli cities. and finally, she'll head to cairo. you'll recall, it was the egyptian president, mohamed morsi, who has been spearheading these peace talks, these truce talks between hamas and israel. so, there's a lot behind closed doors. there's a concerted effort to end this conflict diplomatically, rather than escalating the violence. rob and paula, back to you. >> lama, israel says they're prepared to invade and use a ground game. are they still ready to do so? >> reporter: oh, absolutely. we've been seeing tens of thousands of israeli troops and tanks, massing at the border. they say they are ready to go in, once they get the green light, if they get the green light, that is. but what we do know this, the israeli cabinet had a lengthy meeting, a four-hour meeting overnight, they were not going to ground operations just yet. but the aim of their operation, which is called center of defense, is
clinton visits here in jerusalem later, then goes to ramallah to meet with mahmoud abbas tomorrow and then goes to cairo she's not going to meet with anyone from hamas. the u.s. does have leverage on egypt, given the economic and military assistance the u.s. provides to egypt and given the dire economic straits that the egyptians are in right now. so the u.s. has leverage on the egyptians and obviously the u.s. has very good relations with israel. so the u.s. is a key player in all of this. but as far as leverage on hamas, u.s. leverage is limited. >> secretary of state hillary clinton's arriving soon in jerusalem about three hours or so from now. she'll go to ramallah, then on to cairo. why would she be meeting with the president of the palestinian authority, mahmoud abbas? he has nothing to do with what is taking place in hamas and is this really something that is more symbolic here? >> there's a lot of symbol itch because the u.s. has a lot at stake in the palestinian authority leadership of abbas and the prime minister. the u.s. has had very good relations with the palestinian
with palestinian president mahmoud abbas. this situation is being watched closely by a lot of people here in the bay area. for more on that, let's bring in nbc bay area's jodi hernandez who joins us from emeryville. jodi? >> reporter: raj, there are a lot of folks here in the bay area who have friends and family members either in israel or in the gaza strip. they are very worried by what is happening there. now, we got a taste today of what folks in that area are going through. as you mentioned, it is a region that is still very much under fire tonight. we caught up with the residents of gaza via skype this afternoon. a woman who has been praying for a ceasefire. but judging by the shelling outside her house, it hadn't taken hold yet. >> i was feeling relief when i hear about the ceasefire, but now coming through, i think it's less of a point -- oh my god, just a second. >> reporter: mona al farrah is a project director on the ground in gaza for berkeley-based middle children's alliance, a nonprofit aimed at making life better for palestinian children in the gaza strip. >> people are hudd
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